A 17-year-old boy has died after taking drugs.

Police are warning teenagers about drugs after a 17-year-old boy has died in Preston.

An evening with friends ended tragically for the teen, who’s thought to have taken MDMA and cannabis.

He was at a friend’s house when he started to feel unwell. An ambulance was called and sadly he was pronounced dead shortly after arriving at the Royal Preston Hospital.

Drugs affect how your body works and taking them can harm you or even lead to death. Dealers mix drugs with other stuff so you don’t know exactly what you’re taking or what effect it will have on you. Taking drugs can even make you very vulnerable to being taken advantage of or having an accident.

Don’t take what your friends say about drugs as being the truth. Get the facts here.

What to do if you need to call 999 but can’t talk

If you need urgent help from the police but are too scared to speak there’s a way for you to still get help by calling 999.

 

When you call 999

All 999 calls go to call centres and are answered by BT operators. They’ll ask you which service you need. If you don’t request police, ambulance, or the fire brigade and the operator is concerned they’ll connect you to your local police control room call handlers.

 

If You Call 999 From a Mobile

It’s always best to speak to the operator if you can, even by whispering.

You may also be asked to cough or tap the keys on your phone in response to questions.

If making a sound would put you or someone else in danger and the BT operator can’t decide if you need an emergency service, they’ll transfer your call to the Silent Solution system.

The Silent Solution is a police system used to filter out large numbers of accidental or hoax 999 calls. It also helps people who are unable to speak, but who genuinely need police assistance.

You’ll hear an automated police message, which lasts for 20 seconds and begins with ‘you are through to the police’. It will ask you to press 55 to be put through to a police call handler. The BT operator will remain on the line and listen. If you press 55, they’ll transfer the call to your local police. If you don’t press 55, the call will be ended.

Pressing 55 does not allow police to track your location.

 

What Then?

When transferred to your local police force, the police call handler will attempt to communicate with you by asking simple yes or no questions. If you’re not able to speak, listen carefully to the questions and instructions from the call handler so they can assess your call and arrange help if needed.

 

If You Call 999 From a Landline

Because it’s less likely that 999 calls are made by accident from landlines, the Silent Solution system is not available.

If, when you call 999 you don’t speak, and the BT operator can’t decide whether you need an emergency service, then they’ll transfer your call to a police call handler.

If you replace the handset, the landline may remain connected for 45 seconds in case you pick it up again. If you pick up again during this 45 seconds and the BT operator is concerned for your safety, they’ll connect you to the police.

When 999 calls are made from landlines, information about where you’re calling from will be automatically available to the call handlers to help them to help you.

Knives Cost Lives

Lancashire Police are supporting a week of action aimed at reducing knife crime. You may have heard lots from friends, and on social media about knives and knife crime across the country. There have been some high profile cases and lots on the news including the recent incident at Runshaw College.
Operation Sceptre, which runs from March 11th to 15th, is a national campaign targeting knife crime and those who carry knives.While Lancashire is not experiencing the same tragic levels of knife crime seen in other parts of the country, we are keen to stress that any incident involving a knife could have deadly consequences and destroy lives. While there is a focus on activity during this week, our commitment to taking knives off the streets will continue longer term and involve schools and colleges, health services and trading standards.
Knife bins are being used at police stations in Blackpool, Burnley, Preston, Morecambe, Fleetwood, Greenbank Blackburn, Chorley and Nelson, during the surrender where people can hand in any knives. There are also two permanent bins at Tanhouse and Digmoor Community Centres in Skelmersdale. Knives need to be safely wrapped in tape and newspaper before putting in the bins. If you have a knife and want to get rid of it please take this opportunity to dispose of it anonymously and safely.
Chief Supt Neil Ashton, joint Head of Crime at Lancashire Constabulary, said: “Too many families have been affected by knife crime and just one person being stabbed is one too many. The consequences of carrying and using a knife is devastating and potentially life-threatening.
“We would encourage anyone with information about knife crime in the area to contact police or independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 anonymously.”
Find out about Section 60 stop and searches here
There’s lots more on knife crime on Fearless – Crimestoppers young people’s website.

Forensic Science for the Future

Lancashire Forensic Science Academy is the first collaboration of its kind to be based within a constabulary headquarters. The combination of police forensic expertise and academic excellence within purpose built facilities is designed to create an optimum environment for training and professional development.

Forensics for the future

 

Communities Defeat Terrorism

If you’ve seen or heard something that could suggest a terrorist threat to the UK do not ignore it, report it.

You can help the police tackle terrorism and save lives by reporting suspicious behaviour and activity. If you see or hear something unusual or suspicious trust your instincts and ACT by reporting it, in confidence, at gov.uk/ACT.

Any piece of information could be important, it is better to be safe and report. Your actions could save lives.

Grant is named Young Citizen of the Year

A Skelmersdale teenager has been named as the High Sheriff of Lancashire’s Young Citizen of the Year 2017.

Grant Walker, 18, topped a list of more than 65 young and inspiring people from across the county who have made a real difference in their community.

The announcement was made during a special award ceremony at Lancashire Police headquarters in Hutton on Thursday, March 23rd.

Grant was praised by judges for his work volunteering to help rebuild a community in the depths of Africa and transforming community gardens in Tanhouse, Skelmersdale, despite personal challenges he faced.


John Barnett, High Sheriff of Lancashire, said: “The Young Citizen of the Year Award promotes young people’s achievements, highlighting the valuable contribution they make to the communities in which they live.
“My wife Danielle and I were delighted with the number and variety of entrants for this year’s prize, but, following careful adjudication with the judging panel, we felt Grant was a worthy winner.
“With an extremely challenging childhood and difficulties Grant still gave up his personal time selflessly to help to re-build a community in Africa bringing happiness and life into a disabled community which needed it the most and leaving an imprint of his kindness and good will to help others across the world”
“These awards are designed to celebrate the fantastic work young people like Grant do every day.”

A panel of judges including the current High Sheriff, the Lancashire Partnership Against Crime (LANPAC); Joel Arber, Pro Vice-Chancellor from the University of Central Lancashire and the former High Sheriff Rodney Swarbrick, who initiated the award, also selected a second and third place.

Runner-up Megan Holmes, 12, from Penwortham, was congratulated for her the idea of the ‘hope bag’ which contains items such as hats, gloves, socks, toiletries and foil blankets to be handed out to homeless people living on the streets.

Megan came up with the idea whilst out Christmas shopping with her mum when she noticed numerous people who were spending a cold winter night on the streets of Preston.

In third place was Lewis Baxter, 18, from Blackburn who was recognised for his work in promoting awareness of mental health and understanding others after previously suffering with depression himself.

Chief Constable of Lancashire Constabulary Steve Finnigan said: “We are extremely proud of our continued involvement in the Young Citizen of the Year Award and I am delighted that we have been able to host the award ceremony here at our headquarters in Hutton.
“I have heard all about the wonderful nominations received and the great work that the entrants have done to support other people and communities – some local, some international –  that need it.
“I would like to personally congratulate the winner, Grant, along with the runners up Megan and Lewis for their outstanding, selfless contributions in helping others including disabled children in Africa, the homeless and those suffering with mental health issues.”

Joel Arber, Pro Vice-Chancellor from the University of Central Lancashire added: “It’s tremendous to see so many examples of selflessness, initiative, drive and bravery from young people across the county.
“It has been truly inspiring to learn of their achievements and the impact they’ve made on the people and communities around them.
“Grant is an extremely worthy Young Citizen of the Year who’s not only made a great contribution in his local community but has used his skills to make a real difference to people’s lives in Africa.”

Don’t use a phone at the wheel

From Wednesday 1 March 2017, changes to the law come into effect that mean drivers who are caught using a mobile at the wheel will receive six points on their licence and a £200 fine, doubling the previous punishment.

This means that for those of you who are new drivers, if you are caught just once using your mobile phone whilst you are driving, so that’s within two years of passing your test, you could lose your licence. You will then have to re-apply for your provisional and re-take both the theory and practical tests.

Whether it’s looking at a text or a new social media post, streaming a video behind the wheel, checking emails or making a phone call, all of these activities are dangerous. Research shows that your four times more likely to crash if you use your phone and drive and your reaction time is 50% slower.

For those who aren’t able to drive yet, even as a passenger you can help to keep our roads safe. Don’t distract the driver with a mobile phone, a momentary lapse in concentration could cause a crash. And why not tell your friends, siblings, parents and family members about the tougher new penalties and encourage them to stay safe by not using a phone behind the wheel.

The message is clear and simple – don’t use you mobile phone when driving.

Lancashire students celebrate Safer Internet Day

Students across Lancashire joined their local officers to celebrate National Safer Internet Day 2017, taking part in talks and activities discussing how to stay safe online. Pupils used their creative talents to think of new ways to get these serious messages across. A fun day was had by all – here are some of the best moments.

Safer Internet Day 2017

Tuesday 7th February is Safer Internet Day and this year’s theme is ‘Be the change: unite for a better internet’. Lots of you will be taking part in activities in school and college to think about how to use the internet well and what you can do to improve you online life. The Safer Internet Centre are encouraging you to follow these tips to make a positive change online:

  • Be kind
    Use images and videos to make a positive impact, and think carefully about the impact on others before you share something online.
  • Be the change
    Make the internet a great place for all. Use the positive power of images and videos to help create a better internet.
    Do you know how to be positive to keep yourself and others safe online? Try their Safer Internet Day 2017 quiz now to find out!
  • Be you
    Think before you post. What do your images and videos say about you; are you happy with the story you are telling? What you share online could be there forever, can be misinterpreted and could also reveal personal information about you.
  • Be a critical thinker
    Seeing is not believing… when you see something online take a moment to see the full picture. Not everything or everyone online can be trusted.
  • Be safe
    Never agree to meet up offline with someone you only know online. No matter how friendly they might seem or how well you think you know them, they are still a stranger. Always tell a trusted adult if someone online asks to meet up.

 

 

 

Nominate Lancashire’s Young Citizen of the Year

Applications for Lancashire’s Young Citizen of the Year 2017 close at the end of January.

This year, High Sheriff John Barnett MBE DL wants young people to be nominated who have put others first.

He said: “Some of our youngsters receive negative coverage in the media but my experience has always been that the vast majority are hardworking and help others.
“Perhaps you know someone who goes above and beyond the call of duty at school, a young charity fundraiser or they may be a young carer who looks after a family member – whatever they have done, we’d like to hear about it and they may win the top prize!”
The awards take place every year and involve the High Sheriff inviting applications to find a young person, ideally aged up to age 21, who has helped either their local neighbourhood, an individual, family member or local organisation.

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The University of Central Lancashire are sponsoring this year’s awards, and are happy to be supporting the scheme.  Vice Chancellor Mike Thomas said:  “Our young people play a huge role in making local communities safer and better places to live and it is extremely important that we recognise and celebrate their achievements. Many step out of their comfort zones to make a difference and crucially they act as powerful ambassadors for inspiring positive change in others.”

Winners and runners will be selected by the High Sheriff and a panel of judges from the Lancashire Partnership Against Crime (LANPAC), Lancashire Constabulary, the University of Central Lancashire and the former High Sheriff Rodney Swarbrick, who initiated the award.

Lancashire Constabulary’s Chief Constable, Steve Finnigan said: “This award highlights the contribution that young people can make towards supporting people in their communities, helping to reduce vulnerability and build community resilience.

“Our Volunteer Police Cadets are an example of that as they show that young people have a lot to offer and I am really pleased to play a part in making sure that young people get the recognition and support they deserve.”

All finalists will be invited to attend a presentation at Lancashire Constabulary Headquarters in March 2017 where the winner will receive £500 along with a specially commissioned trophy and certificate from the High Sheriff and Chief Constable Steve Finnigan.

The scheme is being administered by the Lancashire Partnership Against Crime (LANPAC) charity on behalf of the High Sheriff and the closing date for nominations is 31st January 2017.

Two runners up will also receive £100 and a certificate.

Approval of a parent or guardian is needed for the nomination, subsequent publicity and any future events involving the finalists.

Application forms can be completed online at www.lanpac.co.uk. For more information you contact Al Yusuf from LANPAC on 01772 412796.

 

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